My Blog

Posts for: July, 2011

By Penny Creek Family and Implant Dentistry
July 24, 2011
Category: Oral Health
Tags: retainer   braces  

The much anticipated day has arrived: your child's braces have been removed. You are really happy with the way your son's or daughter's smile looks now. All the time, money, and discomfort of having teeth straightened have been well worth it.

But did you know that the teeth could relapse into their old positions if your child doesn't wear a retainer every night?

Why is wearing a retainer necessary?
It is important for both you and your child to understand the reason for wearing a retainer. It has to do with how orthodontia works in causing teeth to move to more satisfactory positions.

The reason that orthodontia (“ortho” – straight, “odont” – tooth) works is that the tissues holding teeth in place are living and keep remodeling themselves. Teeth are suspended in the jawbone by the periodontal ligament (“peri” – around, “odont” – tooth), which suspends the tooth by extending from the cementum of the tooth on one side into the bone on the other. Cementum is the thin layer of calcified tissue covering the dentin of the root. When light forces are placed on it, the periodontal ligament can reform itself and adapt to the pressures it is under.

Orthodontists know how to keep the pressures during orthodontic treatment light enough to cause movement that is slow and steady but not so strong that the tissues are damaged. If too much force is applied, the process can cause damage to the periodontal tissues and tooth roots.

When the teeth have moved to their desired positions, they will continue slowly moving. The purpose of a retainer is to stabilize the teeth in their “finished” position. They must be retained in this position long enough that the bone and ligament can completely re-form around them, a process that can take several months.

Make it clear to your child that a retainer won't have to be worn forever. Once your child understands that it is very important to wear the retainer for a few months in order to stabilize that attractive new smile, it should be easy to convince him or her to use it nightly.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about retainers. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Why Orthodontic Retainers?


By Penny Creek Family and Implant Dentistry
July 17, 2011
Category: Oral Health

Nearly everyone has snored at some point in life. However, if your sleeping partner routinely tells you that you suffer from this problem, you really should take action to confirm or deny your suspicions. You may be like one of the 50 to 70 million people in the US alone that suffer from Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), a medical condition in which the upper airway (the back of your throat) collapses during sleep thus limiting your intake of oxygen. And this condition is serious. If left untreated, OSA can lead to a stroke, impotence, an irregular heartbeat, heart attacks, high blood pressure, and other forms of heart disease.

The first and most important step you should take if you snore is to obtain a thorough examination by both your primary-care physician and our office. We have completed specialized training in sleep medicine so that we can not only diagnose but also thoroughly treat your sleep disorders.

If you are diagnosed with this problem, relax. We have many ways we can treat your condition. One of the most common methods is to provide you with oral appliance therapy. This first line of treatment involves our making a customized oral appliance (mouthpiece) that will hold your lower jaw forward. By doing this, we can move your tongue away from the back of your throat so that your airway is less likely to get blocked while you sleep. (It is this blockage that causes the infamous snoring sound.)

Another option we may consider using to treat your sleep apnea if it is moderate to advanced is a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine. These machines require you to sleep with a mask over your nose and/or mouth and produce continuous pressure in your windpipe so that your tongue is forced forward away from your airway. Not only can these machines potentially eliminate your snoring, but they can also give you the restful night's sleep that you have been missing.

The last and most permanent solution for treating certain non-responsive cases of sleep apnea is surgery. This option is typically reserved for the most advanced cases to eliminate or reduce an obstruction to the airway.

Contact us today to discuss your questions about sleep apnea or to schedule an appointment. You can also learn more about sleep apnea when you continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sleep Disorders & Dentistry.”


By Penny Creek Family and Implant Dentistry
July 10, 2011
Category: Dental Procedures

Some of the most popular smile enhancers on the market today are both over-the-counter (OTC) and professional teeth whitening products. And while studies indicate that bleaching can successfully achieve noticeable increases in whitening of stained teeth, there are some facts you need to know about these products and the results that they can deliver.

  • Nearly all bleaching products contain the same basic ingredient, carbamide peroxide or its breakdown product, hydrogen peroxide. However, the products our office uses to professionally whiten your teeth are much stronger without compromising the health and safety of your teeth, gums, and mouth.
  • OTC bleaches typically contain no more that 10% carbamide peroxide while professional bleaches can contain between 15% and 35%. And to make professional bleaching even more effective, we may use them in combination with specialized lights or lasers.
  • Bleaching is NOT a permanent solution and thus results will diminish over time. The “fade rate” begins to occur 6 to 12 months after treatment.
  • While you can't avoid the fading process, you can extend your bleaching results by avoiding foods and drinks that stain your teeth, such as red wine, red (tomato-based) sauces, coffee, tea, sodas/colas, and blueberries to name a few.
  • Another method for extending your results is to use a straw when drinking beverages that can stain your teeth so that the liquid does not come in contact with your teeth.
  • If you have visible crowns and/or veneers mixed with your natural front teeth, it may be quite difficult for you to bleach your natural teeth so that they perfectly match your veneers or crowns. Remember, tooth whitening is not effective on crowns, veneers, bridgework, or any type of artificial tooth.
  • One of the most common side effects of whitening teeth is tooth sensitivity and irritation of the gum tissues. They both are usually temporary and often occur when you start bleaching; however, they generally subside after a few days.

Overall, bleaching your teeth is an effective way to brighten your smile with minimal side effects. If it is something you are interested in pursuing, talk it over with us first — even if you plan to use OTC products — so that you have a clear understanding about your specific options and projected outcomes. Or, learn more by reading the Dear Doctor article, “Teeth Whitening: Brighter, Lighter, Whiter....”


By Penny Creek Family and Implant Dentistry
July 03, 2011
Category: Oral Health

Nearly everyone is familiar with snoring, having either been awakened by a snoring, sleeping partner or by snoring so loudly that you wake yourself up. As if the sounds emanating from snoring weren't bad enough, snoring is no laughing matter and should never be ignored. And why? It can be a sign of other health issues.

Snoring occurs when the soft tissue structures of the upper airway (the back of your throat) collapse onto themselves, the tongue drops back and air is blocked in its movement through the mouth and nose into the lungs. These obstacles cause a vibration that produces the snoring sound. Snoring can also be caused by large tonsils, a long soft palate, a large tongue, the uvula (the tissue in the back of the throat that dangles like a punching bag), and/or fat deposits.

If snoring is more severe, it may denote a medical condition called Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA; or just “sleep apnea”). It occurs when the upper airway collapses causing significant airflow disruption or even no airflow whatsoever for 10 seconds or more and can leave you feeling tired, depressed, irritable, as well as cause memory loss and poor concentration. But have no fear; you are not alone, as millions of people worldwide have been diagnosed with this condition. There are also numerous treatment options that we can discuss with you — should you be diagnosed with this problem.

You can learn more about sleep apnea by reading the Dear Doctor article, “Snoring & Sleep Apnea.” Or if you are ready for a thorough examination and to discuss your snoring, contact us today to schedule a consultation.