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Posts for tag: tooth pain

By Penny Creek Family and Implant Dentistry
September 15, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay   tooth pain   toothache   cavities  

Brushing and flossing your teeth daily can help prevent cavities. However, despite good oral hygiene, tooth decay can still occur. There cavityare several signs of a potential cavity. If you are experiencing any of them, it is important that you have your teeth professionally examined by a dentist immediately. The Mill Creek, WA dentists at Penny Creek Family & Cosmetic Dentistry can help.

Signs of a Cavity

Not only do cavities cause discomfort, but they can also lead to more serious oral health problems. When cavities go untreated, infections and tooth loss can occur. There are several signs that you might have a cavity, including:

  • Tooth Sensitivity
  • Tooth Pain
  • Chronic Bad Breath
  • Dark Spots on Teeth
  • Holes in Teeth
  • Pus

Experiencing pain or sensitivity in your teeth can mean that a cavity has developed. Many people’s teeth are sensitive to hot or cold foods and beverages and that doesn’t always mean they have cavities. If you have tried brushing with a toothpaste for sensitive teeth and are still experiencing discomfort, then you might have a cavity. Additionally, if your teeth feel especially sensitive when eating extremely sweet or sugary foods, that is an indication of potential tooth decay and/or a cavity.

As mentioned, other signs of a cavity include persistent bad breath and the formation of dark spots or holes in the teeth. These are all indications of poor oral health. Finally, the most serious sign of a cavity is the presence of pus. When pus is present, an abscess has developed and should be treated immediately. If this has happened to you, seek professional dental assistance right away.

Cavity Prevention

There are several steps you can take to prevent cavities. One of the best things you can do to maintain good oral health is get professional dental cleanings from your Mill Creek area dentists at least twice a year. Other cavity prevention measures include:

  • Brushing your teeth with a fluoride toothpaste at least twice a day.
  • Flossing your teeth every night before bed.
  • Rinsing with a fluoridated mouth rinse daily.
  • Limiting the amount of sugary foods and beverages in your diet.
  • Having dental sealants professionally applied to your teeth.

Untreated cavities can lead to more serious problems with your oral health. Taking good care of your teeth and mouth is important to preventing cavities, and that includes regular dental visits. Call Penny Creek Family & Cosmetic Dentistry at (425) 337-7300 to schedule a professional cleaning and cavity check with Dr. Chad Slocum or Dr. Sara Lundgaard, your Mill Creek, WA dentists.

By Penny Creek Family and Implant Dentistry
July 30, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth pain  
TheTypeofToothPainYouHaveCouldbeTellingYouWhatsWrong

As with the rest of the body, tooth pain is an indication that something’s wrong. While the exact cause requires a dental exam, the location, quality and duration of the pain could narrow the possibilities. With that in mind, here are 3 types of tooth pain and what it might be telling you.

Sensitivity. Pain or discomfort when you eat or drink cold foods or bite down could mean you have a small area of decay in the tooth, a loose filling or an exposed root surface from gum recession. Dental work to repair a decayed tooth or filling could alleviate the pain; in the case of gum recession, you may need to reduce overaggressive brushing or seek treatment for periodontal (gum) disease, the two main causes of the condition.

Dull or lingering pain. A dull ache in the rear sinus area could indicate a problem with a back tooth — they share the same nerve pathways as the sinuses, so you may be feeling referred pain. In the case of lingering pain after eating or drinking something hot or cold, there may be decay within the inner pulp chamber of the tooth that’s damaging or even killing the nerve tissue. If so, a root canal treatment might be in order.

Sharp pain. That sudden, excruciating pain when you bite down could mean you’re experiencing advanced decay, a loose filling or possibly a cracked tooth. If the pain seems to radiate from the gums — and they’re swollen and sensitive — you may have developed an abscess brought on by periodontal (gum) disease. In all these cases, appropriate dental treatment like decay removal and filling, root canal treatment or plaque removal may be necessary, depending on the cause and extent of the problem.

Regardless of what kind of pain you’re feeling, you should see us as soon as possible — in many situations waiting will only make the problem worse. The sooner we discover the cause, the sooner we can begin the right treatment to solve the issue and alleviate your pain.

If you would like more information on the causes and treatment of tooth pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Pain? Don’t Wait!

By Penny Creek Family & Implant Dentistry
July 29, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth pain   toothache  
WhyYourTeethMayHurt

Don't ignore tooth pain hoping it goes away. No matter how mild or fleeting it may be, it's a sign that something's wrong. Healthy teeth shouldn't cause discomfort because the parts containing the nerves — the interior pulp and the dentin around it — are shielded by dental enamel and gums.

Here are some common reasons that teeth ache:

  1. Gum Recession. Over time, gums can recede. Improper or excessive brushing can affect them, especially if you are genetically predisposed by having thin gums. When gums retreat, dentin can, or eventually will, be exposed. Besides its susceptibility to sensation, dentin is also more vulnerable to erosion and decay than enamel.
  2. Tooth Erosion/Decay. When acid-producing oral bacteria get the upper hand, they can eat through the tooth's protective enamel to the dentin. You may start feeling sensitivity as the decay gets deeper and closer to the pulp (nerves). Only removal of the decay and filling the cavity can stop the process.
  3. Old/Loose/Lost Filling. Fillings seal off areas of past decay. If they don't fit right or are dislodged altogether, air or food particles can slip inside and irritate exposed nerve endings. A crevice to hide in makes it prime real estate again for bacteria, too.
  4. Cracked Tooth. Teeth grinding and jaw clenching can have a similar impact on teeth that a miner's pick has on rock. At first thin lines in your enamel can develop, then cracks develop that may expose the dentin, and finally the tooth might fracture, exposing the pulp. The earlier this process is caught, the better.
  5. Pulp Tissue Infection/Inflammation. This can be caused by deep decay or trauma and suggests your tooth may be in its death throes. Sometimes the pulp infection travels into the surrounding periodontal (peri – around; odont – tooth) tissues and causes an abscess to develop. This absolutely requires immediate attention.
  6. Residual Sensitivity from Dental Work. Removal of decay before placing a filling can cause tooth sensitivity. It can take 1-4 weeks or so to improve.
  7. Sinus Pain. Congestion can cause “referred” pain in the upper teeth. When the congestion subsides, the pain should, too.

As you can see, it's risky to discount tooth pain and “wait ‘til it goes away.” Our office can help you determine the origin of your pain and the best course of action to resolve it. When in doubt, it's always better to err on the side of caution!

If you would like more information about tooth pain and ways to prevent or treat it, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Tooth Pain? Don't Wait!” and “Sensitive Teeth.”

By Penny Creek Family & Implant Dentistry
November 08, 2012
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth pain   toothache  
DontLetToothPainLingermdashTheCostMayJustBeTooHigh

Tooth pain occurs when a trauma or infection triggers a reaction from the nerves inside a tooth's pulp chamber. The severity of the pain and its duration can vary depending on the underlying cause, which can include anything from a loose filling to an abscess. Ignoring symptoms not only results in unnecessary physical and emotional pain, but can also lead to more expensive dental treatment as problems become more complex. Make an appointment with our office today if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms:

  • Sharp pain when biting down on food — This type of pain could be indicative of a cracked tooth, loose filling, or tooth decay that is affecting one or more of your teeth. We can remove decay and replace a loose filling, but if your tooth is cracked, we will have to determine the location and depth of the crack before formulating a treatment plan. In some cases, root canal treatment or even extraction may be necessary.
  • Pain that lingers after eating hot or cold foods or liquids — Mild and short-term sensitivity (lasting only seconds or a minute) to hot and cold foods resulting from gum recession can often be soothed by using a fluoride toothpaste made for sensitive teeth. However, an inflamed tooth pulp or one that is dying due to severe decay could cause sensitivity that lingers for a long time after exposure. In this case, root canal treatment may be necessary to remove dying pulp tissue in order to save the tooth.
  • Constant severe pain and pressure, swelling of the gums, and sensitivity to touch — Infections and/or abscesses can spread from the tooth pulp into the surrounding periodontal tissues and bone causing this type of pain. Root canal treatment will most likely be required.
  • Dull ache and pressure on one or both sides of the face in the upper teeth region — The sinuses and upper back teeth share the same nerves, so, oftentimes, referred pain from sinus congestion or infection can feel like a toothache. A thorough examination can determine whether or not the pain is dentally related.

If you are experiencing tooth pain, call our office immediately so that we can begin to provide you with some relief. To read about other symptoms of tooth pain and possible treatment options, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Pain? Don't Wait!